Amageddon- ST

Happy Saturday.  This record was $5.  I bought it, despite already having a copy which I bought for $10, because I really wanted to post it and at the time, I was really sticking to my journalistic guns of keeping records at $5 or less.  Such idealism.  Anyway, it was my pal Hugh who first turned me on to this record.  He played the first track and made me guess who the lead singer was.  This is also one of the records I found laying around my apartment on Christmas last year when I had company over the night before and I woke up to a place in massive disarray.

Keith Relf, born in Richmond, Surrey, UK in 1943, had one of the more interesting careers in music, if not one of the more underappreciated.  As the lead singer of the Yardbirds, his efforts were overshadowed by his more famous band mates, namely, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page.  After the group’s demise, Relf first took up with his sister and Yardbird Jim McCarty in the acoustic group Renaissance (a version of which has been posted on this blog).  However, after producing other artists, he formed this super group of sorts in 1974 with Martin Pugh and Louis Cennamo of Steamhammer as well as Bobby Caldwell of Captain Beyond.

Armegeddon released on album (this one) and played two shows before disbanding.  Relf, who was working on reforming his version of Renaissance, would die of accidental electrocution in 1976.  He was 33 years old at the time.  This record would be his last recording.

But here we are with this, which is a hard driving rock and roll album that is really comparable to anything his ex-Yardbird band mates were doing at the time.  The album was a critical success, but since there was no tour behind it, it really did not sell.  So, it has been relegated to a special place in the annals  of the history of 70’s rock.

For a sample, I went with one of the shorter songs, “Paths and Planes and Future Gains”.  It should be noted that the opening song posted above, “Buzzard” is my favorite song on the album.

Great album.  Top Rated.

Bloomfield, Kooper, Stills- Super Session

 

DSCN4227This was $3.20.  Looking at the names on the cover, if you know anything about music and musicians, you would take a chance on this album.

Bloomfield
Bloomfield

Al Kooper organized Blood, Sweat, and Tears, worked with Dylan among others in the early days, and is kind of a musician’s go-to musician if that makes sense.  Mike Bloomfield was one of the first music superstars to be known purely for his guitar playing.  He later died of an overdose.  Steven Stills was in Buffallo Springfield, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, (with and without Young) and is Still alive in spite of that.

Kooper
Kooper

This album was made in 1968.  Kooper, who had just left BS&T, and Bloomfield, who was about to leave Electric Flag, decided to book some studio time with bassist Harvey Brooks and drummer “Fast”Eddie Hoh ( who incidentally played on the Monkee’s albums. The two knew each other from working with Dylan. Bloomfield was a no-show however for the second day, however so Kooper called Stills, who was in the process of leaving Buffalo Springfield.  So the theme of this album and this post is leaving things.

Stills
Stills

The album sold well and went Gold.  It also paved the way for other super-group albums, for better or for worse.  You decide. Fast Eddie Hoh on the other hand, quit music in the seventies.  He died in a nursing home last November.

I just like saying it; Fast Eddie Hoh.
I just like saying it; Fast Eddie Hoh.

The album is pretty good.  The best songs are “His Holy Modal Majesty” and Donovan’s ” The Season of the Witch” (which has excellent drumming from Hoh).  However, both songs are long and I do not like posting long songs, so here is a cut from the Bloomfield session, “Stop”.  It is pretty funky.DSCN4232

Top Rated album.

DSCN4227